13th Age Bookplates

Good News everybody!

I’ll be signing calendars (and whatever else anyone wants signed) at the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund booth 1920/1922 at the San Diego Comic Con this very week!
Times: 3pm on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday

LeeSignsSigning these bookplates I designed is not the most fabulous way to spend my time.
Surprising I know, but there it is.

It does, however, provide a wonderful time to think.
And while the whole domino-effect-stream-of-semiconsciousness catalogue wouldn’t make sense to anyone else, a few random thoughts from that stream might.

1. What am I doing? These are the worst signatures I’ve ever made in my life!

13thAgeBookplates2. Well, I guess it’s pretty clear which of us is the most extroverted. I bet Rob and Jonathan haven’t marked all over their desks. And clearly they don’t own the whole prismatic pack of Sharpies.

3. I might finally be getting the hang of this. I really shouldn’t have signed the smaller pile of meant for the limited edition hardbacks first. I’m glad I’ve switched to a lighter pen color.

4. Holy cow! There are a lot of people who will have this book in their hands. I’m really proud of it, and I hope that those folks take it to their hearts. I’m glad the early reviews have been so positive.

5. I wish that I’d been able to fit GenCon into my travel schedule this year.

6. How lucky am I to have such a short name?

7. I’m so impressed with that nice (and wildly successful) Neil Gaiman. He’s signing way more than bookplates – and The Ocean at the End of the Lane is a tsunami of roiling books – even in Tennessee. And that doesn’t even take into account the books that his fans will bring with them.

CatGaiman8. What would my younger self have thought if he could see this future? Would it have made the compulsory weekend “assisting” my father more tolerable? Or less so?

9. Hey, that dice ring is really shiny. How fun to think that those symbols I made will become essentially invisible User Interface – that they’ll become so standard that people won’t even think about them – or about the fact that the mechanical designers had to fit 13 spinning pieces around the outside. Nicely done people.

10. This is amazing. How unbelievably lucky am I to be where I am right now – living in Portland, working with such stellar collaborators, traveling, with this wonderful life?

13thAge1

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Book Covers and tagged , , , , , by leemoyer. Bookmark the permalink.

About leemoyer

Lee Moyer creates original artwork, branding and design. His clientele includes: Film: 6 Laurel & Hardy classics, The Call of Cthulhu and Spiderman 2 Theater: Andrew Lloyd Webber, Stephen King and Stephen Sondheim Music: Andre 3000, Tori Amos and John Mellencamp Book: Raymond Chandler, Iain Banks, and HP Lovecraft Web: BET, CareerBuilder and Paramount Pictures Game: Electronic Arts, Hasbro and Sony Education: McGraw-Hill, The National Zoo, and the Smithsonian Institution His work has been featured in Communication Arts, The Society of Illustrators, and the New York Times. www.leemoyer.com

2 thoughts on “13th Age Bookplates

    • Keith Baker is more eloquent by far than I.

      I hope that those who supported this game know that we (and the brilliant Paul Komoda) truly appreciate you and did our utmost to get you a wonderful game.
      ________________________________________________________________

      Yesterday, Erik Chevalier of the Forking Path announced that he has cancelled the Kickstarter to produce The Doom That Came To Atlantic City, a board game designed by Lee Moyer and Keith Baker, which is to say, me. When Lee and I first heard this news from Erik, it came as a shock. We’ve been working on this game for over a decade. In 2011 we had it ready to go to the printer with Z-Man Games, until a change in ownership dropped it from production. Based on the information we’d been receiving from the Forking Path we believed that the game was in production. It’s a personal and financial blow to both of us, but what concerns Lee and I is that people who believed in our work and put their faith in this Kickstarter have been let down.

      First of all, I would like to make one thing crystal clear. Lee Moyer and Keith Baker are not part of the Forking Path. Neither one of us received any of the funds raised by the Kickstarter or presales. I haven’t received any form of payment for this game. Lee and I were not involved in the decisions that brought about the end of this project, and we were misinformed about its progress and the state of the game.

      As a designer, I want the ideas I come up with to bring people joy—not frustration, disappointment and anger. Once I sign a contract granting a company the rights to produce one of my games, I am putting my faith in that company and trusting that it will carry out production and delivery in a professional and ethical manner. I’ve worked with Atlas Games, Wizards of the Coast, Steve Jackson Games, Goodman Games, Green Ronin, Pelgrane Press, and many more, and I’ve never been let down until now. Lee and I don’t know exactly how the money was spent, why the backers were misled, what challenges were faced or what drove the decisions that led to the cancellation of the game. Not only did we not make any money from the game, we have actually lost money; as soon as we learned the true state of affairs, we engaged a lawyer to compel The Forking Path to come forward to the backers and to honor its pledge to issue refunds.

      With that said, all that really matters to Lee and I is that our idea has led to frustration and anger instead of bringing happiness. We can’t change the past. We can’t produce the game as presented in the Kickstarter on our own. But under the terms of the contract the rights to the art and design are back in our hands, and we can at least share those. Lee and I will be producing a print-and-play version of the game as quickly as possible, and getting that to backers at no cost. You’ll have to use your own cardstock and paper, and we can’t produce the amazing miniatures sculpted by Paul Komoda. But we can share our ideas and our work, and we hope that you will enjoy it.

      There is one snag: neither Lee or I have access to the list of backers and their email addresses. We don’t even know who you are, and we have no way to thank you directly. If you backed Doom, please contact me through my website Keith-Baker.com. If you know anyone who backed it, please direct them here.

      This is not the end of the road we thought we were on. Neither Lee nor I know how things reached this point, and when I look at the images from the manufacturer that show so clearly that the game could have been made, it breaks my heart. Lee and I will do our best to get you the game in print-and-play form as soon as possible. It’s not what we expected or planned on, but we at least hope that you will finally be able to get some enjoyment from the game we’ve worked on for all these years.

      Sincerely,

      Keith Baker

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s